Is A Big Booty Good For My Health?

Is A Big Booty Good For My Health?

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For years the media has supported thin, slender, long and lean female bodies in their shows. Various companies advertise with these pencil thin models that show what the ideal woman’s body is supposed to look like. Is it really supposed to be that thin? Over the last few years more curves have come to be main stream. Today, we have seen an explosion of large backsides everywhere. There is a huge movement towards bigger is better in the booty department. Check out some interesting news about just how much attention is being given to this area of human anatomy.

In a 2010 study by the University of Oxford, researchers suggested that having a bigger booty helps prevent against diabetes and heart disease. Wow, what a shock that a larger booty can keep you healthy. This doesn’t mean that fat in general will protect you, as if you primarily store fat in your abdomen, you are actually at a higher risk. Now, those who store fat primarily in the hips, butt, and thighs, where found to be at a lower risk for diabetes and heart disease. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the leading causes of death were heart disease, cancer, and chronic lower respiratory disease. This is fact that does not seem to be changing and the research is showing yet another way for us to be healthier and live longer without dying from heart disease.

In a 2012 Harvard health study, researchers suggested that one reason why women may live longer than men is a result of their bigger butts. Typically women have more lower body fat, which is called gluteofemoral fat, and with this fat your body produces chemicals, like leptin and adiponectin which protect you. Leptin interacts with areas of the brain that control hunger, behavior, and signals that the body has had enough to eat. Adiponectin helps with glucose regulation and fatty acid breakdown (MedicineNet.) Just thinking about the reports, why doesn’t every woman and man start working toward getting a big healthy butt? Did you know that we can help you build a larger rounder more muscular booty at GIT RIGHT Sports Performance & Fitness? If you didn’t know, now you know we can. Call 855-734-4878, then come by and see us for your transformation. We want you to be healthy and fill up your jeans at the same time.

Check out what has happened in America over the last 3 years. The report by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons shows that there were 9,993 cases of butt augmentation with fat grafting, a 16% increase from 2012. In addition, according to a new report, close to 10,000 butt augmentations were performed in the U.S. in 2013. Amazing how many people are willing to move fat around their bodies instead of shaping and toning their bodies. These people could have made a lifestyle change that was more health and fitness oriented and got the same results. Granted, the instant gratification is not there in comparison to changing your life. These people had a more shapely buttocks in a few hours of 1 day with a few days for healing and viola, big booty is there. Sorry folks we cannot grant you a huge butt in a few hours of 1 day, but we can show you are healthier lifestyle and complete fitness program that emphasizes building your booty.

This is another interesting report that has been found. Of course this does not speak for all women, but for the population listed the researchers found that out of any body part, women prefer to be complimented on their butt, according to a survey of 3,000 women by Men’s Health.
Their second and third body parts were their eyes and breasts. This is just another reminder of the shift that has come. Well ladies, how does it feel to get a compliment about how gorgeous your eyes are compared to a compliment about your booty or breasts? Of course, presentation plays a huge role in your response when you do receive your compliment. If you want to get more compliments, feel better, and get healthier we are just a phone call away (855-734-4878.)

Reference:
Erin La Rosa-Buzzfeed
MedicineNet
Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)